Migrant Labour Essay

Migrant labour, casual and unskilled workers who move about systematically from one region to another offering their services on a temporary, usually seasonal, basis. Migrant labour in various forms is found in South Africa, the Middle East, western Europe, North America, and India.

General causes and work conditions

In Europe and the Middle East, migrant labour usually has been recruited for urban rather than agricultural employment and involves longer periods of residence. In North America, migrant labour tends to be hired for farmwork, primarily at harvest time. The demand for agricultural migrant labour stems from the seasonal nature of harvesting. In the Northern Hemisphere, migrant labour moves seasonally from south to north following the harvest, while this pattern is reversed in the Southern Hemisphere. Most of these agricultural workers move in established patterns within these general directions, and their work typically involves tasks that are manual, repetitive, and easily learned.

Among the economic conditions that heighten the demand for migrant workers are rapid increases in agricultural production within a given region and a significant loss in the number of farm labourers—a condition often caused by higher wages outside the agricultural sector. While the factors that create the demand for migrant labour may vary, those behind the supply of migrant labour tend to be constant: in most cases, migrant labourers come to their work because of unfavourable economic and social conditions in their home regions.

The short-lived relationship between migrant worker and employer creates a disorderly labour market. Most migrant labourers have no reemployment rights, are usually not organized in unions, and have limited access to the job market. Middlemen, job brokers, labour contractors, and crew leaders add some order to the system. For example, labour contractors will recruit workers, transport and supervise them, and dispense their pay. Contractors also negotiate wages and working conditions with the employers. On the other hand, the wages, working conditions, and standards of living for migrant workers tend to be lower than those of other labourers, and migrants must often work long hours under exacting requirements. In some countries, child labour is widespread among migrant labourers, and even in the United States those children who do not work might not attend school, because in many localities schools are open only to legal residents. There can also be inadequate housing for migrant workers, and their literacy levels, social cohesion, and rates of political participation are low.

Whether native or foreign-born, migrants are fundamentally alien to the community in which they work. As a result, migrant workers can have difficulty accessing local health and social services and can be deprived of rights either because of their illegal status or because they lack easy recourse to the courts. The nomadic nature of migrant workers makes the regulation of their working and living conditions difficult and may negate union and government labour standards that apply to regular work settings.

Employment patterns in North America

In the United States, workers may winter in Florida to pick citrus crops and then, joined by others from Texas and Puerto Rico, move northward into New England as far as Maine, harvesting tomatoes, potatoes, apples, and other farm produce. Another large stream of workers from Texas sets out in the spring for the north-central, mountain, and Pacific states, harvesting fruits, vegetables, sugar beets, and cotton. A third stream of migrants harvests vegetables from southern California northward through the Pacific Coast states.

Increased mechanization of farming has reduced the demand for migrant labour in the United States. Some migrant workers are American citizens of Mexican descent, while many others are illegal immigrants from south of the border. Most are males younger than age 30 and have less than eight years of schooling. In common with those of other countries, many migrant workers in the United States suffer from underemployment, inadequate housing, and exclusion from normal community life. They usually work for low wages and have average annual incomes that amount to only a fraction of those of most American workers. The lot of migrant workers in the United States has nevertheless improved since the 1960s, when labour unions and activists such as Cesar Chavez began to organize the migrants. In addition, some states and localities have established special committees to implement and expand social legislation that benefits migrant labourers.

Migrant labour around the world

Patterns of migrant labour on other continents have differed substantially from those in North America, with urban (rather than agricultural) employment accounting for a much greater share of such work. Migrant labour was used on a massive scale in South Africa, where black workers were drawn from rural areas to work in cities in which they were denied the rights of residency. This racially determined migrancy was a cornerstone of the apartheid system in the second half of the 20th century, which forced millions of black workers to shuttle between their impoverished “homelands” and the cities, where they enjoyed only the minimal rights common to most migrant workers. Apartheid was ended in South Africa with the repeal of social legislation in 1990–91 and the ratification of a new constitution in 1999.

More benign forms of migrancy flourished in Europe and the Middle East in the second half of the 20th century. Rapid industrial growth in the former West Germany after World War II, for instance, produced a severe labour shortage, attracting several million workers from Turkey, Greece, Italy, and Yugoslavia. The same phenomenon drew many workers to France from North Africa, Spain, and Italy, while Britain pulled workers from its former colonies in South Asia, Africa, and the West Indies. After western Europe’s economic growth tapered off in the 1970s, the presence of so many foreign workers became a source of social tension in some of their host countries. An even more dramatic example of migratory employment has occurred in the oil-rich countries of the Persian Gulf, where millions of workers from Egypt, Yemen, Jordan, Pakistan, and other Muslim countries migrate to work in the rapidly expanding economies of Saudia Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Libya, Iraq, and Kuwait.

Migrant workers in India are involved mainly in the harvesting of tea, cotton, and rice. In Australia and the southernmost nations of Latin America, migrants work on ranches more often than on farms, performing such tasks as wool shearing and meat processing.

Human Resource Management And Migrant Labour

Human Resource Management and Migrant Labour


Table of Contents: ‎
‎1.‎ Introduction ‎
‎2.‎ Literature Review ‎
‎3.‎ Critical Analysis and Discussion ‎
‎4.‎ Conclusion ‎

Introduction:‎
Migration in every country leads to a change in the labour market. Countries like UK ‎grant immigration rights to the large numbers of immigrants every year and openly allow ‎immigrations from citizens of their former colonies. The attitudes of a country towards ‎immigration vary greatly on the particular employment patterns and needs at that given time, and ‎these attitudes may change over time. This paper will assess the changes in the labour market of ‎the UK due to the immigrations and its impact on the human resource management in an ‎international setting.‎
A flow of new migrants in any country may have a huge impact on the labour market, ‎however the positive or negative aspect of the impact greatly depends on the jobs being created ‎due to the spending of the immigrants to boost businesses and their production, the drop-off in ‎the activity of the existing population such as the retirement or number of dependent population, ‎and the capabilities of immigrants to fill the existing gaps of skills. Such factors are considered ‎when it is decided whether migration has actually affected the labour market of a particular ‎country negatively or positively. Moreover, in the UK, analysts suggest that the immigrations ‎have led to a huge impact on the labour market which is mostly regarded as a positive one ‎‎(Adesina, 2008, p. 72).‎
Literature Review:‎
According to the statistics and trends which have been observed in the labour market ‎since the 1940s when the mass migration took place, it can be concluded that there have been ‎several positive impacts of migration when it comes to the diversity and the increase in skill ‎levels. But at a critical level of analysis, it can be said that there have been many distributional ‎impacts which means that competition levels in the market rose and businesses experienced more ‎rivalry. As the years have passed since the 1940s, the pressure of migration has increased and the ‎impact of immigration on the UK local communities have also been obvious especially at a time ‎of rapid change that Britain is going through continually from time to time. This is why countries ‎need to maintain the laws and policies for migration and control the negative effects (Ham, 2010, ‎p. 152).‎
Migration has taken place in a number of countries which had opportunities in the labour ‎market. However, due to this migration, the prominent labour markets such as that of the UK ‎have been overcrowded which has resulted in the reduction of wages. The impact of immigration ‎on the labour market is rather a challenging task which is dependent on a number of factors. ‎Some of the important factors are the characteristics of the migrants including skill level, family ‎composition, age distribution, health status, temporary or...

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