English Public Speaking Essays On Abortion

A study of American college freshmen shows that support for abortion rights has been dropping since the early 1990's: 54 percent of 282,549 students polled at 437 schools last fall by the University of California at Los Angeles agreed that abortion should be legal. The figure was down from 67 percent a decade earlier. A New York Times/CBS News poll in January found that among people 18 to 29, the share who agree that abortion should be generally available to those who want it was 39 percent, down from 48 percent in 1993.

''Abortion isn't a rights issue -- it's become for increasing numbers of young people a moral, ethical issue,'' said Henry Brady, a professor of political science and public policy at the University of California at Berkeley who has taken surveys in this area. ''They haven't faced a situation where they couldn't get an abortion.''

Experts offer a number of reasons why young people today seem to favor stricter abortion laws than their parents did at the same age. They include the decline in teenage pregnancy over the last 10 years, which has reduced the demand for abortion. They also cite society's greater acceptance of single parenthood; the spread of ultrasound technology, which has made the fetus seem more human; and the easing of the stigma attached to giving up a child for adoption.

Ten to 15 years ago, said Frances Kissling, president of Catholics for a Free Choice, an abortion-rights group, adoption was generally portrayed as an effort to find parents for needy children. Now, she said, that has changed, as infertile couples desperately seek children.

''Young people are idealistic,'' Ms. Kissling said. ''They think sacrifice is a good thing, particularly conservative Christian kids. One of the main sacrifices you can give is the gift of a child to a deserving couple.''

The most commonly cited reason for the increasingly conservative views of young people is their receptiveness to the way anti-abortion campaigners have reframed the national debate, shifting the emphasis from a woman's rights to the rights of the fetus.

Abortion opponents celebrated on March 13 when the Senate passed a ban on a procedure that its critics call partial-birth abortion; the bill is expected to pass the House quickly and be signed by President Bush, and to immediately face a court challenge. Even though the procedure is used in only a tiny fraction of cases, graphic descriptions of it since the mid-90's, and even the name its foes have given it (doctors call it dilation and extraction), have had an impact on young people. ''There's been so much media attention over the last seven to eight years on partial-birth abortion, we shouldn't be surprised that some of it has had an effect on 12-to-14-year-olds, and it is a public relations coup for the National Right to Life Committee,'' said David J. Garrow, a legal historian at Emory University.

Britni Hoffbeck, another speech student at Red Wing High who opposes abortion, put her argument succinctly: ''It's more about the baby's rights than the woman's rights.''

Tom Cosgrove, a communications consultant in Cambridge, Mass., who has researched the views of young people for abortion-rights groups, said: ''All the restrictions that the right-to-life movement has imposed, young people look at and say, 'They're a good thing, because it's meant to protect a young woman's health.' They don't want the label of pro-choice. The pro-life side figured out that this is about children, whereas the pro-choice movement is focused on women and choice.''

Some young people who oppose abortion, and who were born after the Roe v. Wade decision in 1973 declared that there is a constitutional right to abortion, have adopted a new rhetoric. One is Kelly Kroll, a junior at Boston College and president of American Collegians for Life, who says she is a ''survivor of abortion'' because she was adopted. ''Myself and my classmates have never known a world in which abortion wasn't legalized,'' she said. ''We've realized that any one of us could have been aborted.''

Margaret Watson, a junior at Rutgers University who recently started an abortion rights group on campus, RU Choice, said that because the historical circumstances surrounding Roe v. Wade are distant, her peers take the right to an abortion for granted. ''For my generation, we have always grown up knowing we could have an abortion,'' she said. ''I look at being pro-choice as being American, to have free will. I would hope that mothers do decide to keep their babies, but I just want women to be able to make up their own minds.''

One reason there may be less support for abortion among the young is that they are less likely to imagine having to consider an abortion, because teenage pregnancy rates are down. The pregnancy rate among girls age 15 to 19 declined 19 percent between 1990 and 1997, to 94 pregnancies per 1,000 girls from 116 per 1,000, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Experts attribute the decline to greater awareness of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases, which has led young people to become more cautious about sex. Studies show that fewer high school students engage in sexual intercourse, and that contraceptive use is up.

''There are better contraceptives -- RU-486, the morning-after pill -- along with an emphasis on sex ed, abstinence and slogans like 'Not me, Not now,' '' said a sophomore at Hunter College High School in Manhattan whose father did not want her to be identified. ''Abortion isn't such an issue, because getting pregnant isn't such a prevalent problem among my peers.''

Some parents trace their teenagers' anti-abortion views to sexuality education programs that stress abstinence as the only way to prevent pregnancy and disease, and that in the process sometimes demonize abortion. The federal government budgets $50 million annually to programs known as ''abstinence only till marriage,'' which are taught in 35 percent of public schools nationwide, according to the Alan Guttmacher Institute.

Renee Walker gave permission for her seventh-grade son to participate in such a program last fall in his public school in Concord, Calif. But she said she became alarmed when, reviewing his class notes, she found a list of the disadvantages of abortion, including the circled words ''killing a baby.'' He said he had been told abortion ''tears the arms and legs off.''

Ms. Walker sent a letter of complaint to officials of the district, Mount Diablo Unified School District, expressing her surprise that the abstinence curriculum had been created by First Resort, a Christian anti-abortion and pregnancy counseling group. ''Most parents are busy, doing laundry, running around like me, and we're trusting the schools to reflect public policy,'' she said. ''I had an anti-choice critter jump out of my son's backpack and was running around my house.''

The district agreed with Ms. Walker that the First Resort program was overly graphic, a schools spokeswoman said. It asked for, and got, modifications, she said.

If today's teenagers and young adults maintain their views on abortion, and if succeeding waves of students are also conservative, the balance could tip somewhat in America's long-running abortion war, some experts speculate. It's unclear whether the shift will ever be substantial enough to change the centrist position of a majority of Americans of all ages: that abortion should be legal, with restrictions.

In Red Wing, the certainty of the youthful opinions of the students reminded their speech-class teacher, Jillynne Raymond, of an earlier generation's certainty.

''Teenagers have strong opinions,'' Ms. Raymond, 41, said. ''It's no different than the 70's when I was a teenager, but the difference is that the majority of speeches then were pro-choice. I wanted the right to an abortion as a woman. The focus then was not having the government tell me what to do with my body.''

''Today,'' she said of her students, ''the majority is pro-life.''

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Abortion

Abortion is one of the most debatable and controversial issues that exist today in our society. There are people who support the idea that it should be a choice of each and every woman – whether to do it or not, while others claim that no one has a power to decide, whether to bring life on the planet, or put an end to it. As for me, I have done a certain research on the subject and I found out that there is no other right variant for me, than to choose life. I will explain what I mean.

No matter, how we persuade ourselves, every woman that decides to put an end to her pregnancy understands that it is wrong. It couldn’t be another way, as our instinct tells us that it is absolutely unnatural to decide for another human being, whether he should live or die. Yes, they can come up with different excuses, but it in no case changes the sense of their action, the action that will cost life to their child.

It was scientifically proven that children in uterus start perceiving things very early. Their heart starts beating on the sixth week, and brain starts working at the same time. So, when abortion is done, it is in fact the end of life of a human being that already can feel and think. If I were in such a situation, I just couldn’t have taken the responsibility for someone else’s life. I know that I am responsible for myself – I can, for instance, smoke, consume alcohol and spoil my own health in this way – it will be my choice, and indeed no one can make me stop it unless I want. But when we speak of unborn children – what kind of choice is this? This is not…

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